Monthly Archives: May 2019

How to Write a Monologue Fast and Easily

a man lies on the grass writing in the notebook

If you struggle with your monologue assignment or want to improve the quality of your papers of this type, then this article is definitely for you. We have gathered the best tips and pieces of advice for students who have to write a monologue.

What Is a Monologue?

First, let’s find out the basics of this type of paper. What is a monologue? A monologue is a solo speech of a character that is performed on a particular event, experience, etc. It allows us to get a better understanding of a character’s feelings and thoughts. In literature, dramatic monologues are spoken out loud or are represented in the form of the inner monologue of a character to himself.

The Key Features of a Monologue

The majority of the character monologues share key characteristics. For example:

  • A monologue can be written in rhyme or without it as it can be used both in poetry and in prose.
  • A monologue is a speech of one character only.
  • A monologue can be represented in the form of a speech to an audience or an inner speech as a representation of a character’s thoughts.
  • A monologue is used to represent the opinion or experience of the character.
  • A monologue is written in the first person from the perspective of the character.
  • A monologue has to combine past and present actions and reveal the correlation between them.

These are the basics that you need to consider when writing a monologue. Make sure to fill the monologue with emotions as it is the most important part of the good monologue.

Writing a Monologue

Many students get confused when they are assigned to write a monologue and try to find the answer to the question “How to write a monologue essay?” Sometimes such an assignment can be given when studying a particular piece of literature in order to get a better understanding of the character and his or her motives, aspirations, etc.

If it is the case, students are given a situation when a character has to perform a monologue. In other cases, students are free to choose the character and the circumstances that accompany the monologue.

Monologue writing always helps to develop good writing skills and perform a deeper analysis of the literature work. If you would like to improve your writing skills, you might be interested in our article that contains some tips for you.

Step 1. The Character Choice

If you got an assignment to write a monologue, start with thinking about what your topic will be. If your teacher gave you specific guidelines on the character that you need to speak for or a particular scene that you need to incorporate your monologue in, then you have a half of the task done. If not, think of the character who faces a difficult emotional situation. For example, Elizabeth Bennet from Pride and Prejudice or the eponymous hero of the novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte.

Write down the notes about the events that precede the monologue and form the emotional state that your character is in. For example, if your character witnessed the murder or was participating in a crime, etc. This will help you to understand what you should write about and how your character should feel at the moment. This will also help you not to forget to mention these events if needed.

Step 2. Writing an Outline

As any other writing assignment, a monologue requires an outline. By thinking through the structure of your future piece, you improve the readability and the logical flow of it.

The majority of monologues share the same structure that consists of the beginning, the middle and the ending parts. Each of these parts has transitioning sentences that help to blend everything together into the story with a natural, logical flow and idea evaluation.

It’s great if your monologue has its climax – the point of the most intense emotion or a decisive action that is framed into the story. You might put the climax of your monologue in any part of it:

  • It might be placed at the beginning of your monologue as the catchy paragraphs that draws attention and helps to set the tone of the monologue.
  • In the middle – with the emotional intensity that grows from the beginning, reaches the climax and then goes down at the end of the monologue.
  • At the end of the monologue – as the intriguing closure.

So, make an outline that would organize the ideas which you want to evaluate and consider the part of your monologue that is the most suitable for the climax of your story.

Step 3. Drafting

After your outline is ready, you can start working on your draft. Keep in mind that you need to follow the character’s manner of speaking and make a monologue close to the individuality of the speaker.

Focus your monologue on a particular point of view and build a monologue starting with the notes that you have prepared that go straight to the point and the main idea of your monologue. Later, you can add details and move the parts of your monologue if needed.

A tip:

If you struggle with a monologue concept, try the following exercise. Speak for one minute straight without pause. Just say what comes to your mind. Try it for one more minute but this time try to tell a story instead of random sentences. Incorporate emotions and thoughts on any subject. Here you go, you have just performed a monologue that might help you to get a few monologue story ideas.

Add twist and turns to your monologue to make it more alive and compelling to keep the readers’ attention through the whole piece. If you want to add elements of surprise, it’s better to place them at the beginning of the new paragraph.

Step 4. Editing

Once your draft is ready, proofread the whole piece and try to analyze if your monologue fits the character and the scene or circumstances in which it takes place. You can add quotes that might fit the monologue or refer to the particular events if they are significant for the character at a specific moment.

These are the main steps of monologue writing. If you need some help with other types of assignment writing, we have a few pieces of advice on writing an autobiographical essay and a critical response essay.

 

How to Write References in Different Citation Styles

a girl covers her face with a book

Writing references in your papers is one of the most important and tricky steps of assignment completion. Many papers get low grades because of incorrect references and in-text citations. So, learning how to write references according to the most widespread citation styles is a necessary skill for any student of any learning institution.

Let’s dive into the topic and learn more about the importance, the structure, the common usage, and the similarities and differences of the most popular citation styles.

The Importance of Correctly Formatted References

Every student has to understand that citation is an important part of an essay, research paper, thesis or dissertation as it allows to support your statements and also guide your readers to the sources that they might need to get a better understanding of the topic which you explore in your work.

Every teacher or professor provides guidelines and requirements that you need to follow in order to get a high grade. Some teachers require citing all the sources that you examined throughout the research process even if you didn’t use them in your final version of your text or didn’t take any quotes from them. Other teachers might require mentioning sources that weren’t used in the work but might be interesting to the reader as the additional source of information.

Chicago Style

Chicago is a common style of citation that implies using one of the two methods: “notes and bibliography” and “author-date.”

Notes and Bibliography System

The notes and bibliography system is usually used for works related to humanities – literature, philosophy, linguistics, but the most commonly to history. This method implies citing sources in numbered notes (footnotes or endnotes) that correspond to the number in the text and also can be found in a separate bibliography list that is organized in alphabetical order.

The main advantage of this system is an opportunity to list a wide variety of sources, even the most unusual ones and create neat reference lists.

Chicago style reference example

Source: DISD

    • Note

1. John Smith, ed., The Book Title (Indianapolis: Example Press, 2016), 156–68.

    • Shortened note

1. Smith, Title, 156–68.

    • Bibliography entry

Smith, John, ed. The Book Title. Indianapolis: Example Press, 2016.

The Author-Date system

The “author-date” system is commonly used in social sciences and represents a brief citing of the source in the text by adding the author’s last name and the year of publication in parentheses. Every citation, in this case, matches a complete reference from the list where more details are given.

So, if you need to cite a source in your text, use parentheses to put the author’s last name, the year and page numbers if needed. Chicago style doesn’t imply separating the name and the year with a comma. That’s why your citation will look the following way:

(Smith 2018)

or

(Smith 2018, 213–17)

  • In-text citation

(Smith 2016, 156–68)

  • Reference list

Smith, John, ed. 2016. The Book Title. Indianapolis: Example Press.

If you haven’t received guidelines on the method of the Chicago style that you need to use in your work, then you can choose the one that is more preferable to you. For example, the one that will be easier for you to navigate through.

You can find more detailed information about organizing your reference list, citing various types of sources or how to write references from a website in the official guide – The Chicago Manual of Style that was originally published in 1906. It contains all the necessary information on the Chicago style and rules of citation that you might need for your work.

You might also be interested to learn how to write abstracts, for example, for your scientific paper.

Turabian Style

Chicago style is often associated with Turabian style – a style developed by a student in the book A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations which is often referred to as simply “Turabian.” It is based on The Chicago Manual of Style with some changes made to suit the requirements of academic papers. This manual also describes itself as an authoritative resource on the Chicago style for students.

The Chicago style and the Turabian style manual covers

Source: CMOS Shop Talk

APA Style

APA format was designed by the American Psychology Association and has a lot in common with the “Author-date” method.

It implies citing the author’s last name, the year of publishing in parentheses, and the page numbers for a direct quote if needed. But in the case of APA-style citation, the comma between the last name and the year of publishing is required. There are also two ways of citing the source in APA style: citing the author’s name in the sentence or in parentheses.

  • In-text citation

Smith (2018) provides the list of…

or

… to the contributors (Smith, 2018).

If there are two or more authors, use commas and ‘&’ between them: (Smith, Grey & Duke, 2018) or (Smith & Duke, 2018).

APA Manual also states:

When paraphrasing or referring to an idea contained in another work, you are encouraged to provide a page or paragraph number, especially when it would help an interested reader locate the relevant passage in a long or complex text.” (p. 171)

For example, (Smith, 2018, p. 156).

  • Reference list

Smith, J. (2018). The Book Title. Indianapolis, IN: Example Press.

You can also visit the APA style official website to find the detailed information or use quick guides and a full manual to get a better understanding of how to cite a master’s thesis in APA, for example.

MLA Style

A style that was developed by the Modern Language Association more than half of the century ago is called MLA style. It implies using brief in-text citation and a detailed list of the cited sources at the end of the work.

  • In-text citation

The key difference of this citation style from others is that it requires citing the last name of the author and a page (or multiple pages) number in parentheses, for example (Smith, 28). It also allows using the author’s last name in the text, citing only the page number in brackets at the end of the sentence.

For example:

Smith was the first one who claimed that this statement was false (124).

  • Works Cited

All of the sources that you used in the process of creating your work should be cited in the list in alphabetical order. MLA style has the following order of the elements of the cited works:

Author. Title of source. Title of container, other contributors, version, number, publisher, publication date, location.

The “container” part is what MLA style defines as the “larger whole,” that the work might be a part of, for example, the series of books or magazines. At the same time, stories, books, and newspaper articles are smaller pieces that can be stored in these “containers.”

To see how these rules are applied, check out our sample essay formatted in MLA style. 

MLA also provides useful templates and quick guides to help you organize your work and your citations according to the MLA style.

Citation Generators

The part of the work that you need to perform can be done for you. Writing experts from our professional writing service are at your beck and call. They are able to organize your paper in any format you need. Alternatively, you can use the citation generators. Some of them automatically format your bibliography pages according to the chosen citation style. Find them below:

  1. Citation machine
  2. EasyBib
  3. BibMe
  4. Cite4Me
  5. CiteFast

Use these generators to get your bibliography page quickly. However, you should always check the pages for errors, as the generators might also make mistakes.

Wrapping Up

Follow the guidelines that your professor provides you with, such as the citation style, and make sure to check out the detailed manuals and guides that listed in this article. You can find more detailed instructions about citing such sources as web pages, informal sources, e-books, etc.

If you struggle not only with citation styles but with writing itself, check out our useful tips on how you can improve your writing skills.